WORLDWIDE eDISPATCH - 23 SEPTEMBER 2010

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                   Dedicated to Emergency Communications by RADIO

EMCOMM  QUARTERLY  
                 
             Official Journal of the World Radio Relay League
 
                                                       www.wrrl.org  

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VOL.  7 -- No. 1                       www.emcomm.org                        FALL  2010
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IN THIS ISSUE
The EQ PHILOSOPHY - SIGNS, SIGNALS, WAYMARKS and INDICATORS
SHORT CIRCUITS - News and Announcements
BACK TO BASICS - Reminders

FEEDBACK,  MUSINGS and SPURIOUS EMISSIONS
The EM ADVISOR - "Q and A"
WRRL NEWS and NETS
TRAFFIC HANDLING
NETWORK NEWS - "N.E.T.S."
SHOW US YOUR SHACK
FEATURE - LET'S SIMPLIFY OUR TRAFFIC SYSTEM 
EMCOMM SPECIALTY ITEMS - Stuff for Sale
NEW SUBSCRIBERS
and CONTRIBUTORS
REFERENCE and RESOURCE SECTION

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The EQ PHILOSOPHY
SIGNS, SIGNALS, WAYMARKS and INDICATORS

The use of signs, signals and waymarks has been around since the dawn of time and probably pre-date any codified written language.  The oldest sign or waymark arguably is the cross.  Two lines drawn on the earth or scribed on a tree to form a simple X or 
+.   Another early sign or symbol would be the simple arrow --> indicating a direction of travel.  Today, we are bombarded with signs, symbols and logos everywhere we go.  A few years ago a world-wide survey was conducted to find out what signs/logos were recognized in the most countries.  The most universally recognized was the red Coca Cola® dot!  Placing second was the Red Cross +.


In amateur radio communications, signals are rated using the RST system (RS for voice).  E.g.. - "Your signal report is 57."  ("Radio check" is an improper and useless term.  Obviously the radio is working or there would be no reply.  It provides NO information as to readability, signal strength, tone, propagation/fading (QSB), noise (QRM and/or QRN),  etc.)


SOS ...---...
(International Morse for DISTRESS) is an important and easily recognizable signal.  If heard, it immediately gets your attention!  Skilled communicators use many special signs and symbols.  For example the letter O is never used or said for ZERO which is written as Ø.  The symbol for degree º is used when recording temperature as well as degrees of latitude or longitude.  The radio communications list is endless.

Non-radio signs and signals are important.  The wail of a siren on an emergency vehicle, or a pair of red flashing railroad crossing lights are a common example of an auditory and a visual warning signal.  They both demand that we had better pay attention!  Road signs are waymarks.  They can be simple mile markers, directional, STOP or SLOW, or a street sign.  Electronic billboard signs along highways are becoming more and more common.  It is important for emcomm operators to pay attention to signs as well as signals.  (Ref: "What Is Your Location?"  in the December 2008 EM FEATURE SECTION at: www.emcomm.org/em/2008/dec2008.htm )

"Mile-markers" or "bench marks" also mark time.  Here are few significant benchmarks in amateur radio emcomm:

 

1935 - AREC (now ARES®) and in 1949 the NTS were organized.  Both have changed from the original intent over the years.  In many areas the ARES® remains a viable public service organization mostly providing local communications and coordination in support of community events such Walk or Bike-A-Thons, parades, etc. plus emcomm for local emergencies.  Very little emphasis is placed on originating or handling third party message traffic.  This is mostly due to the fact that the infrastructure rarely breaks down even in storms and/or disasters and most public service agencies rely upon their own communication systems.  Also the general public is unaware that amateur radio can take a message and get it delivered.

Sadly, the ARRL/NTS is a mere shell of what it once was.  Email and a myriad of other non-radio modes have siphoned off much of the interest in a regular, non-commercial, radio-based system to handle message traffic.  Another factor is that the generation of radio operators, who saw the value in maintaining a national corps of skilled emcomm operators not dependant upon commercial services and not using complicated and often confusing systems or modes (computers), is rapidly fading away.

Most NTS activity today is traffic solely between amateurs wishing birthday greetings, or "your license is about to expire" notices, etc.  In most areas, the general "disconnect" between local ARES® units and the ARRL/NTS continues to be a problem.

I don't handle a whole lot of message traffic myself, but it is a rare treat to handle a RADIOGRAM when sent or forwarded in the correct format and using proper procedure.  It gets very discouraging when poor operating skills are "the norm" and this by some older operators who either never learned the importance of doing the job right -- every single time -- or are just lazy or don't really give a hoot!

(One of our readers recently commented: "In my experience, except for the canned and trivial "happy birthday" and "license expiring" pipeline fillers, errors are the rule instead of the exception.  Every message that I've originated has been corrupted and ruined enroute.  It's bound to happen when anyone is allowed to handle traffic with no quality control or minimum-required skillset.  All it takes is one weak link in the chain." )

1999 - The first EMCOMMWEST was held at Palo Cedro, California.

2000 - The weekly "5-1-2 Bulletin" which soon became The EMCOMMWEST BULLETIN was published.

2004* - marked the first issue of EMCOMM MONTHLY.  In the July, August and September** issues we explored the somewhat rhetorical question:
What Killed Amateur Radio?  Looking back and reading those articles again, we are convinced that we were correct.  The decline in interest and subsequently the number of radio amateurs that see the value of maintaining a corps of skilled, disciplined emcomm operators, capable of originating, relaying and delivering third party message traffic during disasters and other communication breakdowns and using only basic equipment, is slowly but surely fading away.

2009 - (September) we announced that EMCOMM MONTHLY would become EMCOMM QUARTERLY http://www.emcomm.org/em/2009/sept2009.htm
Among other reasons, we were simply running out of (new) material, and the idea of re-hashing what we have said again (and again) was somewhat boring.  Granted, what we teach and preach is of interest and of great value to new hams and new readers who are interested in public service.

LOOKING BACK...ON THE "+" SIDE
We are convinced the our efforts (EM, EQ and WRRL) have made a difference in delaying this decline.  We have inspired many existing emcomm traffic operators to "hang in there" and we know that there are many emcomm volunteers who have discovered what real emcomm is all about, have developed an interest in the same, and have progressed in their skills and ability to an amazing degree.  And we (the whole EQ and WRRL Team) accept whatever credit may be due for what we have been able to accomplish and/or preserve.

LOOKING BACK...ON THE "-" SIDE
Resource typing is the "standard" in most emergency services and ARCT*** is the only simple and systematic amateur radio resource typing system that has ever been proposed.  Sadly, ARCT has not widely caught on as much as we hoped, but it is in use in a few places.  The reluctance to support it has nothing to do with it being a flawed or complicated system.  (Although some have tried to make more complex than is necessary.)  It is because the majority of hams see amateur radio as "only a hobby" and are apathetic about public service (which, by the way, is the basis and purpose of the amateur service as defined in FCC Part 97.1.).  Another reason is that ARCT did not originate with someone else.  The NIH (not invented here) syndrome.  Also, it would take very long for any non-ham observer to listen in to what is on the amateur bands, and conclude that 99% of ham radio today is hobby activity, that the majority of transmissions are by unlearned, undisciplined, and sloppy operators that are often discourteous and/or illegal!

But at least EM, EQ and WRRL tried...valiantly.  In 2005 we came very close to final approval of the ARCT system by FEMA .  But after Hurricane Katrina and other subsequent disasters, the bureaucracy failed.  The final blow was when a new "administration" took over in 2009 and apparently the slate got wiped clean and all records of the progress we had made were "lost".


INDICATORS

Most modern hams are used to LED or LCD indicators for signal strength, audio level, or whatever.  These are the radio equivalent of "idiot lights" on your car or truck instrument panel.  But most of us old-timers prefer analog meters.  S-Meters, forward and reflected power, power output, line voltage, plate voltage, grid current, plate current, "real meters", voltage and CPS (cycles-per-second) on an AC generator, etc.  We are those who know and enjoy the smell of ozone, or the sacred incense rising from lead-solder flux or a slightly over-cooked capacitor.  We love the sound of static and fading and the warm glow of vacuum tubes.  This gestalt**** makes up a portion of what has been called The MAGIC OF RADIO.   Sadly, this "magic" is foreign to today's "appliance operators."
   
Here is a short list of indicators that are reflecting the need for some changes:

1. Our operating expenses (web and internet service fees, domain registry, etc.) remain fixed or have increased.  But (sadly), not one single monetary contribution has been received since the summer issue of EQ.  This is the first time period between issues that this has happened.  We acknowledge that "the economy" is in the toilet and that times are tough (except for the ruling elite).   EQ and EMCOMM.ORG do not carry paid advertising and have always depended upon voluntary contributions plus the sale of our EMCOMM LICENSE PLATES, DVD's and RUBBER STAMPS -- some of which are sold at our cost.  This indicates that what we are doing isn't worth even few bucks to most of our readership.  However, we do say THANK YOU to those of you who have sent a few "green stamps" our way over the years.  We are NOT asking for any more donations.  When our residual funds are exhausted...we will "sign off" for good.  This meter reads: ZERO.


2. The stream of literary contributions of items of interest to emcomm operators that are original material has also dried up.  This meter reads: S1.

3. Sloppy, rude, incompetent, and ILLEGAL operations are more and more common on the airwaves.  Jammers, hecklers, and other varieties of Neanderthals cruise around the bands demonstrating their shortcoming in the "manhood department."  Two meters is the new ham radio version of CB.  And the HF bands aren't far behind. Our editorial staff is discouraged by this trend.  Two of our staff have given up on amateur radio almost entirely.  Others of us have reduced our emcomm activity to only a few surviving public service nets.  Nets that don't sound like a "good 'ol boys" ragchew.  It is hard to remain as "cheer leaders" for the amateur service when pure radio has almost been over-ridden by computers and other non-radio technologies and when your interest is waning.  The meter on this subject reads: S2

4. Aging, fatigue, and burn-out are a significant factor.  Let's face it, the "graying" of amateur radio is a reality, and every week we hear of another key going silent.  EQ has now become pretty much a one-man show and the editor-publisher is experiencing the wear and tear of aging.  As he said in September 2009, "I'll not list all of the physical problems that I am experiencing, but will say that arthritis and bilateral Depuytren Contractures have crippled my hands to the point that it is painful and increasingly difficult to type.  And long hours on the keyboard exacerbate the condition." This meter reads: S3.
(From the September 2009 EQ )  http://www.emcomm.org/em/2009/sept2009.htm

5. Finally, no one likes to hear or read the same rhetoric over and over and we at EMCOMM QUARTERLY have finally come to the realization that we have done just about all we can do.  We apologize to recent subscribers.  Please do not think you are being left out in the cold.  Back issues of EMCOMM MONTHLY and EMCOMM QUARTERLY  are archived at: www.emcomm.org/em  There is a wealth of useful and entertaining information and we encourage you to review them. There is also a handy "site search" function to locate topics that have appeared in previous issues.  This meter reads: S3.

EMCOMM.ORG will continue and our website www.emcomm.org will remain active at least until our residual funds are depleted.  Also we will issue occasional EMCOMM BULLETINS to our subscribers during widespread disasters and other occasions as needed.    Items for sale (E.g.- EMCOMM LICENSE PLATES) will remain available while the current supply lasts.

Therefore the winter issue (December, 2010) will be the last issue of EMCOMM QUARTERLY.

D. W. Thorne, K6SOJ

Editor - Publisher

 * June 2004: http://www.emcomm.org/em/2004/June2004.htm
** July 2004: http://www.emcomm.org/em/2004/July2004.htm   
   Aug. 2004: http://www.emcomm.org/em/2004/august2004.htm
   Sept 2004: http://www.emcomm.org/em/2004/september2004.htm
*** ARCT:     http://www.wrrl.org/arct_program/default.asp and http://www.emcomm.org/ARCT/default.asp
**** Fuzzy German word with no exact English equivalent, variously defined as completeness, configuration, essence, form, manner, organic structure, totality, and wholeness.

POST SCRIPT
As for now, the WRRL will continue and hold out as one of the last amateur radio organizations standing.
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SHORT CIRCUITS

BAND CONDITIONS
"When band conditions get rough...the tough keep going."

GATA SOUND AND RECORDING
Remember Richard Webb, NF5B?  Richard and Kathleen were radio operators who provided communications between LSU Medical Center New Orleans and the outside world for six days immediately following Katrina.  Kathleen is wheelchair-bound and Richard is blind.  The dual-purpose remote recording truck they have been working on for about four years is now operational.  Its secondary purpose is a mobile emergency communication station.  See:  http://www.gatasound.com/

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BACK TO BASICS
Make Good Operating Procedures A Habit!
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REMINDERS FOR OPERATORS WHO CARE ABOUT PROPER 'PHONE PROCEDURE:
Ref. www.wrrl.org/operating/itu_phonetics.htm  and  www.wrrl.org/operating/icao_radiotelephony.htm     
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FEEDBACK,  MUSINGS and SPURIOUS EMISSIONS
THANKS
Thanks for all the good information and suggestions about looking at the upcoming hurricane season. One thing to consider if we do have  an active season is the problems we will see from the Gulf spill and the ability for a hurricane to 1-disrupt the cleanup and 2-pick up the sheen and volatile dispersant used and carry them far inland as  materials in rain.  It's going to be an interesting season and ham radio in general and proper message handling in particular will be a needed skill set. 73 and thanks for all you do. - Jeff Montgomery, WB4WXD, Palestine, TX
(June 1)
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THE EM ADVISOR
The staff of EMCOMM QUARTERLY is happy to answer your questions to the best of our ability.  Some are "FAQs" (Frequently Asked Questions) and others are of a specific nature.  Each month, we will answer questions that may have value to other emcomm radio operators.  Technical questions are forwarded to our Technical Advisor, Ed Ewell, K7DXV.  Questions about our ARCT program or NIMS/ICS are forwarded to Jerry Boyd, N7WR.  Others may be forwarded to other staff members.  Questions regarding emcomm in general are usually handled by D. W. Thorne, K6SOJ. Some will wind up on our FAQ page at: http://www.wrrl.org/faq.asp   

Before submitting a question, we ask our readers to check the FAQ page first...your question may have been asked before.  Also, please consider checking our site search page at: http://www.emcomm.org/search.htm  to see if your question may have been previously addressed in EMCOMM MONTHLY.  Thank you.


Q:
  I hope you don't mind a few questions about your simple NVIS.  I'm a new Ham and am really enjoying working public service events and just now getting involved in the local RACES group.  Do you think a mag mount would establish a good enough ground plane for the wire?  I was going to give it a try this week end from the QTH to see what kind of SWR I have.  Second question on the 40 meter 33 ft. section, what is at the other end of the wire?  Is it a lug mainly for weight to get it in the air or to tie to?  I really enjoy the WRRL Emcomm newsletters. Thanks again.  Dave Holmes, W5SYF - Ft. Worth, TX


A:   A mag-mount should work satisfactorily.  Get the largest and heaviest base magnet than you can, and put it in the center of the largest metal roof vehicle you have.  On the far end, I use a large solder lug (soldered on) with a hole large enough to accept a nylon cord.  A bungee cord that will reach to whatever you are attaching the end to will also work.  But you can use any dielectric material.  PVC, Bakelite, dry wood, glass, etc..  I keep a supply of assorted plastic pipe parts in my shop.  A 1/2 or 3/4" tee with a hole drilled through each end makes an excellent center insulator for a G5RV or half-wave doublet.  But as with most everything, you won't know until "you do the experiment" and run a few tests. - Editor
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WRRL HF NETS 
(ALL SERIOUS EMCOMM OPERATORS WELCOME)

 REGIONAL EMCOMM NETS:
    Pacific (and Mountain) Time Zones:  PTZNN (Jefferson Noon Net/JNN) daily at 1200 PTZ on 7204/± kHz (7214 and 3911± kHz alternate)

    Central (and Eastern) Time Zones:  CTZNN (Lincoln Noon Net/LNN) Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 1200 CTZ  on 7183± kHz
 WRRL NET on  2nd and 4th MONDAYS on 14.280 MHz USB (listen up or down the band as much as 20 kHz)
   2000Z (When on Daylight Saving Time) and 2100Z (When on Standard Time)
 WRRL STATION MAP UPDATE
   Map showing the location of WRRL stations can be viewed at: http://www.wrrl.org/map     

- ∙ ∙ ∙ -
TRAFFIC HANDLING

“For want of a letter, a word was lost.
             For want of a word, a message was lost.
                         For want of a message, a life was lost.”

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"Record Message Traffic, by skilled operators, and by RADIO (only)!"   It's all about Dependability, Accuracy and Accountability!

NOTE:  "Record Message Traffic" means that a record is kept of all traffic you handle, (for at least a period of one year), in the event a question comes up later.  It also documents that YOU did your job properly and correctly!   (Assuming that you did...of course.)
- ∙ ∙ ∙ -
EMCOMM and TRAFFIC HANDLING NETS


LINCOLN NOON NET - LNN (CTZNN) M-W-F

MONDAYS, WEDNESDAYS, and FRIDAYS at 1200 CTZ on 7183 kHz  LSB.
All emcomm stations in the Central (U.S.) Time Zone, PLUS the Eastern and Mountain Time Zones are invited to check in.

JEFFERSON NOON NET - JNN (PTZNN) DAILY
DAILY at 1200 PTZ on 7204 kHz ± LSB.  (7214 and 3911 kHz alternate)

Stations in the MTZ (and CTZ, if the band is very long) are also welcome!

The LNN and the JNN are for operators who want to learn and/or practice proper net operating procedures and standardized traffic handling skills.  Stations in the MTZ (band conditions permitting) can potentially participate in both of these nets, and thereby provide a relay circuit between the east coast and the west coast on 40 meters three times a week!   It is anticipated that the LNN will eventually become a daily circuit.

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THE “TRAFFIC HANDLER’S MANTRA”  (Recite often to help remember the eight parts in preamble):
“No • Prepared • Ham • Should • Copy • Priority • Traffic • Delayed”
NUMBER 
PRECEDENCE HX (Handling Instructions) • STATION OF ORIGIN CHECK PLACE OF ORIGIN TIME DATE

To help you to memorize the eight parts of the preamble,  RECITE the "Traffic Handlers Mantra" often:
“No • Prepared • Ham • Should • Copy • Priority • Traffic • Delayed”

ASSESS
your current traffic handling skill.  Take the "TRAFFIC HANDLER’S CHALLENGE" at: www.emcomm.org    (main page)

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NATIONAL EMCOMM TRAFFIC SERVICE  (N.E.T.S.)

The NATIONAL EMCOMM TRAFFIC SERVICE uses designated watch and calling frequencies.   Public service amateur radio operators everywhere are invited to monitor these frequencies whenever possible.  But when disasters or other incidents occur, emcomm operators are asked to warm up their radios and "light up" the NATIONAL EMCOMM TRAFFIC SERVICE..."24/7".  Active operators know which bands are most likely to be "open" depending upon the time of day, season, etc.

During disasters and for other emergencies, the frequencies are "open nets".  When traffic becomes heavy, they will become "command and control" frequencies with a net control station "triaging" traffic and directing stations with traffic to another (traffic) frequency.  (At least 5 kHz away.)  Proper net procedures are essential.

NETS does not maintain regular schedules and does not handle routine "make work" messages such as birthday greetings, "your license is about to expire", "book messages", etc.  NETS is intended to supplement and fortify other networks by providing a vehicle for emcomm operators to originate, relay and deliver legal radio message traffic (I.e. - "first class mail") of any precedence, at any time, from and to anyone and anywhere--especially during disasters or other crises.  NETS stations will cooperate and use other networks that are known to be capable of accurately and efficiently handling RADIOGRAMS.

NATIONAL EMCOMM TRAFFIC SERVICE (NETS) WATCH • MONITOR • CALLING • TRAFFIC FREQUENCIES
All listed frequencies (except 60 meters) are nominal.  Actual nets may be up or down as much as 20 kHz
SSB:
•   1982 kHz

•   3911 kHz RADIO RESCUE (SSB and CW)
•   5332 kHz "Up" to other 60M channels as necessary. 50W maximum ERP. (Activated during actual incidents.)
•   7214 kHz
• 14280 kHz
ALASKA ONLY: 5167.5 kHz (USB emergency traffic only)

CW:
•   1911 kHz
•   3540 kHz
•   3911 kHz RADIO RESCUE (SSB and CW)
•   7111 kHz
• 10119 kHz

• 14050 kHz
ALASKA -
 3540/7042/14050 kHz
GULF STATES (LA, MS, TX, AL) - 7111 kHz 1100Z-2300Z / 3570 kHz 2300Z-1100Z

  During EMERGENCIES: 7111 kHz daytime,  3570 kHz nighttime.

  (Times approximate depending on band conditions and changes in sunrise/sunset.)


VHF/UHF FM
• LOCAL EMCOMM SIMPLEX - 146.55 MHz
• RED CROSS EMCOMM SIMPLEX - 147.42 MHz
• NATIONAL CALLING SIMPLEX - 146.52 MHz 

Frequencies listed may be on or near other established net frequencies.

As a matter of operating courtesy, always move up or down a few kHz to avoid QRM when a frequency is in use.

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"SHOW US YOUR SHACK" 
"SHOW US YOUR SHACK" is at: http://www.emcomm.org/em/shacks       
• Send a picture of you AND your shack (all in one frame and in JPG or JPEG format) to: k6soj@wrrl.org     

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FEATURE ARTICLE

 

LET'S SIMPLIFY OUR TRAFFIC SYSTEM - REVISED - by D. W. Thorne, K6SOJ
(Original published in the July 2005 issue of EMCOMM MONTHLY - http://www.emcomm.org/em/2005/july2005.htm )

Let's begin by reviewing the definition of emergency communications:

 

1.  Emcomm is simply the ability to transfer a message or other information from one place to another under emergency or other adverse conditions when normal channels of communication fail, are overloaded, or are otherwise not available.  An emcomm station should be free-standing and independent and as technically simple as possible.  It should NOT rely upon ANY commercial services and/or "infrastructure".  (Internet, telephone, email, power companies, etc.)

2.  In the amateur radio context, third-party non-commercial messages are accepted, relayed, and delivered (as rapidly as possible) by skilled amateur radio operators using their own radio equipment.

3.  Messages may be TACTICAL or FORMAL and have a precedence of either: EMERGENCY, PRIORITY, WELFARE or ROUTINE.
4.  In a wide-scale incident, there must be a system in place in order for messages to reach the addressee.  REMEMBER: the local postal service and telephone service will likely be interrupted, and may not be restored for days, weeks, even months.

5.  This process is relatively simple.  Nearly every licensed ham can learn these skills in a few hours.  All it takes to learn this skill is some basic instruction, practice, and participation in net operations on a regular basis.
6.  This is NOT "rocket science".  All a message needs is: an address, the message itself, and who it is from.  It also needs some simple record and routing information to facilitate an accurate and timely delivery.

7.  An established route (net system) and standardized methods of relayed messages is absolutely essential.

 

The problem is that most ham operators never learn traffic handling and most never (regularly) participate in emcomm and/or traffic nets.  Another problem is that some who do, attempt to make the whole process overly complicated.

 

Most public service hams realize that the once-mighty ARRL/NTS is fading away and agree that "something needs to be done".  Cheap long-distance telephone plans and email have made it difficult to maintain any sustainable level of participation in the 56 year-old-service.  HAPPY BIRTHDAY, SEASON'S GREETINGS, or YOUR LICENSE WILL EXPIRE SOON  messages are, frankly...passé.

Seven years ago this writer (I was the Sacramento Valley SEC at that time) submitted a formal written proposal to a special ARRL committee as to how the NTS could be salvaged by integrating with the ARES®.   In fact, the proposal was submitted twice through the appropriate channels.   Sadly, no response was ever received as to whether or not the proposal would be considered.  (Read that proposal in the July 2005 EM.  http://www.emcomm.org/em/2005/july2005.htm )

 

WHAT EMCOMM OPERATORS CAN DO TO IMPROVE THEIR CAPABILITY:

1. Pledge to learn and maintain the skill of message traffic handling.  Use only the universal RADIOGRAM format.  Forget the ICS-213 message form for radio-relay work.  It was not designed for that purpose and does not work.

2. Maintain an emergency station to the best of his/her ability and budget.

3. Become "a regular" on both your local and regional traffic nets.

4. Learn (and practice) all you can about proper operating procedure and on-the-air etiquette.

5. If your EC, DEC, SEC or other EMCOMM leader is asleep, senile, semi-comatose or just inept ...ask some hard questions.  Shake things up a bit!

 

DELIVERING A MESSAGE WHERE THERE IS NO AMATEUR STATION NEAR THE ADDRESSEE
An reader asked: "Does anyone have any good suggestions or solutions to moving traffic into areas which do not have a station staffed by a skilled operator?"

This is a very real problem.  Amateur radio will never be capable of meeting the needs of everyone, in every place, at every time. But we could try!  In the June 2005 issue we said:  "We envision a network of 60,000 amateur stations (10% of the 600,000 licensed radio amateurs in the U.S.), plus others around the world at outposts, villages, towns, or cities on land, plus as many maritime mobile stations as possible.  Each with the ability to accept and receive record message traffic!"  As far as we're concerned, it's a disgrace that the majority of licensed amateurs are hobbyists, take their amateur privileges for granted, and display little interest in service to the public.

 

ABOUT COURIERS

Message by courier is as "old as dirt".  Motorcycle, Moped and bicycle couriers should be included in overall planning.  Four Wheel Drive (4WD) clubs and associations are another very worthwhile resource.  How about horseback (backcountry equestrian organizations) or small watercraft/boating clubs?   What about cross-country and marathon runners?   Consider enlisting the support of local motorcycle, bicycle, equestrian, boating and running clubs.  These methods should be seriously considered.  But all couriers must understand how to transport and deliver messages in a safe, secure and reliable manner.

 

Messages should each be in a sealed envelope (addressed).  They should be transported in sturdy waterproof container and may be locked or sealed.  A "fanny pack" or a canvas shoulder bag works well.  Israeli Paratrooper, Swiss Army, or other over-the-shoulder courier bags are commonly available from military surplus outlets.  Also, an inexpensive hard tube carrier can be easily made from a 16-20" piece of 2 or 3" diameter schedule 40 PVC pipe.  Permanently seal one end using an end cap and PVC glue.   Cement a threaded adapter with a screw off cap on the other end.  A handle or carrying strap can be made from inexpensive cord or webbing.  These can then easily be secured to a bicycle, motorcycle, or horse.  Be sure that courier bags and tubes are clearly labeled: "If Found Return To:__________.
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======================================================
EMCOMM SPECIALTY PRODUCTS

EMCOMM "LICENSE PLATES"
(While current supply lasts)
View at:  http://www.emcomm.org:80/products/
$10.00 each or 2 for $18.00 - postpaid

Or, outfit your emcomm team by ordering:
10 for $70.00 - postpaid (shipped to one address)
Mail check or money order to:  EMCOMM, P.O. BOX 99, Macdoel, CA  96058

RADIOGRAM TRAINING DVD (While current supply lasts)
Features D. W. Thorne, K6SOJ, as the instructor.  The session was taped live at the U.S.F.S. facility at Redding, CA on October 29, 2005 by Paul Peterson (K6PTT).  As you watch it, you'll feel like you are actually in the classroom.  DW begins with a review of the history of communications beyond the horizon, followed by a thorough explanation of the "whys and wherefores" of basic message handling.  Essential information for all emcomm operators is presented in a palatable way. The video includes a brief overview of the ICS.  Thanks to Robert Jackson (KB6YTD) of Weaverville, CA, the quality is good.  Disclaimer: This is not your usual scripted, studio, well-rehearsed, and edited training video--it is raw and unedited and it includes flub-ups, bloopers, jokes, as well as unsolicited comments! There are a few "glitches" that could not be remedied; however, it is not necessary to adjust your player or TV when you encounter them, but rather just let the video run.  Not rated. 155 minutes.   $10.00 ea. and includes protective case, study and instructor's guide.  $5.00 for extra DVD (disc only) to same address.  $18.00 for two complete sets to one address.  The DVD is copyrighted.  Contact us for permission to make copies (for non-commercial use only).
Send check payable to: EMCOMM, P. O. Box 99, Macdoel, CA  96058

MORE EMCOMM SPECIALTY PRODUCTS AT:
http://www.emcomm.org:80/products
=====================================================
NEW SUBSCRIBERS - WELCOME!
EQ lists new subscribers so existing readers can look for other emcomm operators in their area and hopefully provide support for one another.

Robert Sellars, KB2FEL, Old Fields, WV - ARES®
Larry Trotter, KI6YUK, Quincy, CA - ARES®, RACES,  ARC, PCDSW,  EOC
Stanley Klakamp, K8LL, Bowling Green, OH
Tom Muzzin, VE3THR, Barrie, ON - City of Barrie and South Simcoe ARES® Group
Ken Johnson, W3GFM, Erwin, TN - ARES®, SKYWARN
Chandlee White, KJ4ADX, Greensboro, NC - Guilford County ARES®, Greensboro Chapter of American Red Cross
James Crosby, K4JEC, Crozet, VA - ARES®
Ted Hopkins, KC2LRH, Cincinnatus, NY - ARES®, Remcom, CERT
Donna Hinshaw, AG6V, Petaluma, CA - CERT in Petaluma
Carl Gosline, KJ4VLC, Warner Robins, GA - SKYWARN, ARES®

Kenneth Jackman, M.D., WA2DPM, Saranac Lake, NY - ARES®, RACES, SARNAK (SAR of the Northern Adirondacks), WALS (Wilderness ALS)
Joseph Rouillier, KD5JBC, Thornton, CO - ARES®

Dane Luckey, KJ4RVZ, Navarre, Fl
Jay Musikar, AF2C, Palm Coast, FL - AREC, RACES
Les Hovland, AEØX, Seneca, MO - ARES®
Jim Perry, KI6RYE, San Francisco, CA and West Linn, OR - NERT, ACS
Michael Harrigan, N2YTU, Vermontville, NY - RACES, Franklin County Public Health, Adirondack Amateur Radio Association

Rick Coleman, KE5FHL, Buda, TX - WRRL, ARES®, Baptist Men Disaster Relief
Robert McMillan, VE6XMB, Raymond, AB
Jeffrey Waldrop, KDØKUR, Johnstown, CO
Richard Bopp, KCØNPA, Shakopee, MN - DCEC
John Knott, N4JTK, Orlando, FL - ARES®, RACES, REACT
Richard  Green, N7CUD, Vancouver,  WA - ARES®, RACES, Red Cross

Craig Blaine, WB2FVE, Westerville, OH - ARES®
Ray Maxwell, W7TAP, Reno, NV - ARES®
Francis Jenkins, GW8JJZ - Aberavon, Wales, UK - RAYNET
Robert Decker, K7BD, Duvall, WA - MARS
Kent Hathaway, K7DXP, West Jordan, UT - ARES®, RACES
Jim Piper, N6MED, Truckee, CA - ARES®
Robert L. Reedholm, WA6IJD, Phoenix, AZ
Michael A. Ellithorp, KF6OBI, Willows, CA - ARES®
John Hursey, N8GNV, Willows, CA - ARES® EC, RACES, Red Cross
James Kantor, KCØARX, Clearwater, MN - ARES®
Jerry Juhala, KT6CRT, Alameda CA - ARES®
Andrew Sankey, KB1TGL, Gouldsboro, ME - Hancock County EMCOMM
Dennis Hamilton, AD4PS, Okeechobee, FL - MARS, ARES®, RACES, FEMA DISASTER RESERVIST
Howard E. Jackson, W1WMJ, Ashland, OH - WRRL, SATERN, ARES®, SKYWARN
Arthur Putnam, N7MNK, Moyie Springs, ID - ARES®
Kevin Slovick, KS4FUN, Pleasant Hill, CA - ARES®
Dewey Thrush, KB8UB, Munith, MI
Brent Cater, W5FRG, Clarksville, AR - ARES®, RACES, SAR
James Walls, KB3TOF, Greenville, PA - RACES
Russell Koogler, KJ6KKQ, Paradise, CA - ARRL
Colin Jones, KDØDQT, Bailey, CO
Brian Bell, KC2VMV, Rochester, NY
Ancil A. Lynch, 9Z4FI, San-Fernando, Trinidad and Tobago
Dave Holmes, W5SYF, Fort Worth, TX - Tarrant County RACES
Harold Middleton, KDØMLO, Brooklyn Center, MN
Philip Shaver, KJ6GQW, Rancho Mirage, CA - RACES
Scott Fisher, KJ4ULJ, Roanoke, VA - ARES®
Steve Murphy, KE7WAQ, Nibley, UT
Chris Rolfe, M3OZP, Folkestone, Kent, UK - Radio Amateurs Emergency Network
Nita Lyman, KE7DRT, Port Angeles, WA - ARES® AEC, Olympic Medical Center

• Chris Church, KCØZYI, Grandview, MO - RACES, ARES®, CERT
Gary Davis, KE7MQF, Bountiful, UT - ARES®
Allan Munnik, VA7MP, Langley, BC Canada - RACES

RECENT CONTRIBUTOR$
- Thank you for your support!

The individuals listed below have made monetary contributions to help EMCOMM QUARTERLY and EMCOMM.ORG survive.


• Out of over 2450 subscribers:  ZERO
• 


EMCOMM QUARTERLY and EMCOMM.ORG are private (non-government, non-commercial) endeavors and are funded by donations from emcomm operators who are concerned about preserving the ability of amateur radio operators to be prepared to provide skilled, accurate and efficient emergency communications during times of disaster or other events where normal channels of communication may be interrupted or overloaded.  If you have benefited from our efforts, and would like to support this work in a tangible way, you may do so by sending a check or money order payable to: EMCOMM.

Mail to: EMCOMM, PO Box 99, Macdoel, CA  96058.  Your donation is an outright gift and is NOT tax-deductible.

SORRY: We have no PayPal®, credit card, or other methods to accept the electronic transfer of funds.


REFERENCE and RESOURCE SECTION
 
• ICS-ARCT GUIDE:  www.emcomm.org/ARCT/    
• WRRL ARCT Page www.wrrl.org/arct_program/

• TRAFFIC HANDLER’S CHALLENGE: http://www.emcomm.org/thc  
• OPERATING PROCEDURES:  www.wrrl.org/operating  
• PHONETICS: www.wrrl.org/operating/itu_phonetics.htm  
• RADIOTELEPHONE PROCEDURES: www.wrrl.org/operating/icao_radiotelephony.htm      

• GEAR AND EQUIPMENT LIST: www.emcomm.org       (Click on GEAR CHECK LIST)

• FEMA TRAINING COURSES:  http://training.fema.gov/emiweb/IS/crslist.asp       
• FEMA TRAINING COURSE IS-700 (NIMS): http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/IS/is700a.asp  
• ARRL FSD-218.  The famous “pink card” that contains (almost) “everything you ever needed to know about RADIOGRAMS”.
  An electronic version of FSD-218 is at: http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/forms/#fsd-218       
• NTS page by W7ARC: http://www.w7arc.com/nts       
• PUBLIC SERVICE COMMUJNICATIONS MANUAL: http://www.arrl.org/public-service-communications-manual
• PACIFIC AREA TRAFFIC NETS:  http://home.earthlink.net/~k7bfl/nwnets.html       
• MARITIME MOBILE SERVICE NETWORK: http://mmsn.org/    
• BEAUFORT WINDSPEED SCALE:  http://www.zetnet.co.uk/sigs/weather/Met_Codes/beaufort.htm       
• NOAA/NWS WINDCHILL CHART: http://www.weather.gov/os/windchill/index.shtm       
• STANDARD TIME ZONE SCALE:  http://www.travel.com.hk/region/timezone.htm  
• HOSPITAL DISASTER SUPPORT COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM (HDSCS):  http://www.hdscs.org       
• U. S. AIR FORCE Search and Rescue SURVIVAL MANUAL MIRROR SIGNALING (AFM 64-5 Aug. 1969)
   http://www.emcomm.org/drawings/Mirror_Signaling_mid.jpg       
 
SUBSCRIBE TO EMCOMM QUARTERLY  www.emcomm.org/subscription.htm   -- IMPORTANT:  Many internet service providers (ISPs) are installing "SPAM filters" in their system that may block EMCOMM QUARTERLY both inbound or outbound (if you try to forward it to someone).  To ensure that you receive EQ and SPECIAL BULLETINS add: @cot.net, @wrrl.org, and @emcomm.org to your "Whitelist" with your ISP.  Contact your ISP if you have any questions.

 

ABOUT ADDRESS CHANGES:  Every month, a varying number of EQ are returned as "undeliverable addressee unknown" or "rejected due to containing possible objectionable material".  Our very limited, all-volunteer staff does not have the time, energy, or desire to track down everyone who changes their email address and forgets to notify us.  Also, if a subscriber installs a "spam filter" or a "parental control device" and neglects to tell the filter that it's "OK to let  EQ  pass through", we do not have time or patience to jump through secret hoops, or solve puzzles, to allow us to send email to you.

If you change your email address, be sure to notify us at: www.emcomm.org/subscription.htm    ... that is, if you want to continue to receive EQ.  EMCOMM QUARTERLY is originated in 10, 12, 14, and 18 point Arial font and transmitted in HTML format.  Occasionally, selected portions are set up in the Lucida Console font.  HOWEVER...we have received a few reports that on some computer screens...EQ appears unformatted in Plain Text or FUBAR.  ("Fouled Up Beyond All Recognition.")  If this happens to you, you can always view EQ, as it is intended to appear, at: www.emcomm.org/em        

Upon request  EMCOMM QUARTERLY will be transmitted in plain text format to visually impaired subscribers who use an email-to-audio conversion program, and/or other subscribers whose computers do not process email in HTML format.


EMCOMM QUARTERLY and EMCOMM MONTHLY archiveswww.emcomm.org/em       
 
SEARCH FEATURE AT EMCOMM.ORG  www.emcomm.org       
 

The opinions expressed by individual contributors do not necessarily reflect the EQ philosophy, the editorial position of EQ, or its staff.

 

ARES® and Amateur Radio Emergency Service® are registered service marks of the

American Radio Relay League Inc., and are used with permission.


For permission to reproduce material in EMCOMM QUARTERLY and EMCOMM MONTHLY
contact: D. W. Thorne at: k6soj@wrrl.org    or write:
EMCOMM, P.O. Box 99, Macdoel, CA  96058  U.S.A.


EQ STAFF (also WRRL Board of Directors):
D. W. Thorne, K6SOJ - Editor and Publisher - k6soj@wrrl.org   
Jerry Boyd, N7WR - Associate Editor and ICS Advisor - n7wr@wrrl.org       

Bill Frazier, W7ARC - Associate Editor and Webmaster - w7arc@wrrl.org       
Ed Ewell, K7DXV - Technical Advisor - k7dxv@wrrl.org       
Ed "FB" Trump, AL7N - Traffic Editor and Alaska Correspondent - l.trump@att.net 
(View "bios" at: http://www.wrrl.org/staff.asp pictures at: http://www.wrrl.org/shacks/default.asp

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EMCOMM QUARTERLY -- The Official Journal of the World Radio Relay League - WRRL®

EQ is published four times a year (March, June, September and December) and is copyrighted (c) 2010 - All rights reserved.
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