WORLDWIDE eDISPATCH - 1 APRIL 2009 - 0035Z

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   Dedicated to Emergency Communications by RADIO

        EMCOMM  MONTHLY   
                       
Official Journal of the World Radio Relay League
 
                                                           www.wrrl.org  

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

VOL.  5 -- No. 9                      www.emcomm.org                     APRIL  2009                      
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The EM PHILOSOPHY - SIX WOMEN

SHORT CIRCUITS - News and Announcements
FEEDBACK,  MUSINGS and SPURIOUS EMISSIONS
The EM ADVISOR - "Q and A"

ICS PERSPECTIVES - by Jerry Boyd, N7WR
WRRL NEWS and NETS
TRAFFIC
 HANDLING
NETWORK NEWS - "N.E.T.S."

SHOW US YOUR SHACK
FEATURE - FORM OR FORMAT?

EMCOMM SPECIALTY ITEMS - Stuff for Sale
NEW SUBSCRIBERS and CONTRIBUTORS
REFERENCE and RESOURCE SECTION

- -
The EM PHILOSOPHY
SIX WOMEN
On November 3, 2006 over 100 horses were stranded on a small island in The Netherlands.  After all official attempts to effect a rescue had failed, six brave and innovative women undertook the job.  Working as a team, along with other rescuers, they successfully rescued the horses.  This rescue is an example of a human response of the highest caliber.  The link below takes you to one of the most moving and inspirational videos we have ever seen.   It epitomizes the EM Philosophy...when all other efforts have failed, get the job done!   Their mission was to rescue horses.  Our mission is to get messages delivered "when all else fails."  If you missed the six minute video (with a great sound track), you can view it at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e8iSYMkFO2A&feature=related 
- -
SHORT CIRCUITS
RECENT NET FREQUENCY CHANGES:
(Due to foreign SWBC interference after the change to daylight saving time in the U.S.)

LINCOLN NOON NET - LNN (CTZNN) M-W-F 
MONDAYS, WEDNESDAYS, and FRIDAYS at 1200 CTZ on 7214 kHz ± LSB.
All emcomm stations in the Central (U.S.) Time Zone, PLUS the Eastern and Mountain Time Zones are invited to check in.

JEFFERSON NOON NET - JNN (PTZNN) DAILY
DAILY at 1200 PTZ on 7214 kHz ± LSB.  (7204 and 3911 kHz alternate)
Stations in the MTZ (and CTZ, if the band is very long) are also welcome!

The LNN and the JNN are for operators who want to learn and/or practice proper net operating procedures and standardized traffic handling skills.  Stations in the MTZ (band conditions permitting) can potentially participate in both of these nets, and thereby provide a relay circuit between the east coast and the west coast on 40 meters three times a week!   It is anticipated that the LNN will eventually become a daily circuit.
- ∙ ∙ ∙ -
REGARDING FONTS AND EMAIL ADDRESSES

When setting up a new email address, consider that,  In the Times New Roman font (which a lot of computers have set as the default font), the figure 1 and the lower case L ( l ) display exactly alike.  This makes it difficult for someone to transcribe correctly.   ALSO consider avoiding using the _ (underscore) and/or the . (dot) in your email address.  Since punctuation is not used in RADIOGRAMS (except the slant bar /).  If an email address is included in the text of a RADIOGRAM, these symbols have to be spelled out. - Editor
- ∙ ∙ ∙ -
NEW NVIS ANTENNA PAGES
A well done NVIS antenna page is on the EmComm East 2009 website at: http://s3.amazonaws.com/emcommeast2008/NVIS.pdf

ALSO VISIT OUR OWN NVIS pages at:
http://www.emcomm.org/projects/
http://www.emcomm.org/antenna/default.asp

-
∙ ∙ ∙ -
EMCOMM WEST

May 1-3, 2009 - Circus Circus, Reno, NV  www.emcommwest.org/

EMCOMM EAST

October 3, 2009 - St. John Fisher College, Rochester, NY  www.emcommeast.org/
- ∙ ∙ ∙ -
A HAVEN FOR SPARE PARTS
An interesting N.Y. Times story - "A Haven for Spare Parts Lives On in Silicon Valley."
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/05/technology/personaltech/05basics.html
Submitted by Peter Rosenberg, AC7SB, Fall City, WA
- -

FEEDBACK,  MUSINGS and SPURIOUS EMISSIONS

 

Message received by Marty Woll, N6VI, Chatsworth, CA:

"I read your comments about the March issue of EMCOMM MONTHLY.  Nice job.  I am sure you have advised our volunteer group(s) how informative this newsletter is to communicators and the fact that it is free, leaving no reason not to subscribe to this informative forum.  I have recommended EM to our ACS* members in the past, however it bears repeating how valuable a learning tool this helpful resource can be to dedicated operators.  Additionally, as you have mentioned in your message handling instructions, it brings everyone together for a common understanding of what is an acceptable standard format of use.  Thank you for your continued high standard of education and training, ensuring that all of us can be the very best emcomm resource possible.  Kindest regards, 73,:

 

Truman Van Dyke III, KE6JCA

LAFD ACS Operations - COML, COMS, COMT, INCM, RADO
---------------------------------

Marty adds:

"Truman is a professional LAFD firefighter and is part of the command staff with L.A. City's Fire Department-managed ACS.  I'm now the training officer for ACS and recently taught a class on formal message handling.  I referenced your DVD during the course.  He is encouraging hams to sign up for Emcomm Monthly and that's a good thing.  I've been pushing that for several years now.  BTW, you wrote an outstanding commentary on Capt. Sullenberger and Cactus 1549.  The parallels with what we do are spot on."

 

Marty Woll, N6VI
Vice-Director, ARRL Southwestern Division
Ass't DEC, ARESLAX
BCUL 15, LAFD ACS
CERT III

EM COMMENT:  Thanks Marty and Truman.  It is feedback like yours that keeps us at all going.  And to you...keep up the great work!  (NOTE: It was my pleasure to meet Marty when I was in SoCal a couple of years ago. Check out N6VI at QRZ.COM) - Editor

*ACS = Auxilliary Communication Service.  Provides volunteer emcomm operators for government agencies by incorporating RACES with non-amateur communication services such as FRS, GMRS, CB, public service band, email, telephone, etc.

- ∙ ∙ ∙ -
FOLLOW UP ON SUPPLY OF .50 CALIBER AMMO CANS

Last month (March EM) we mentioned a possible interruption in the supply of used surplus gov't issue (GI),  .50 caliber ammo cans. These steel boxes are strong, waterproof, dustproof, and inexpensive.  They are of value to emcomm operators since they make excellent protective cases for radio gear (plus other equipment and supplies.)  We asked our readers: "if anyone can document this to please let us know."  We received varied responses.

On the "negative side" one reader wrote: "That is correct. They have been ordered to destroy them. It seems that the insurgents were using them to hold IED's." 
(If that is accurate, it wouldn't surprise us, but doing that would make about as much sense as destroying commercial airliners because terrorists used them to attack the WTC! - Editor)


On the "positive side" Sam Saladino, NW9T, of South Beloit, IL did some research and reports:  "I found that this rumor has been floating around since at least 2007.  Explanations have ranged from the government wanting the boxes to be sold for scrap, to the government switching to plastic boxes.

"I've found these websites still advertising steel boxes for sale at a cheap price:"
http://www.armysurplusworld.com/product.asp?engine=froogle&productID=920  $9.99
http://www.usmilitarysurplus.com/surpluscatalog/product_info.php?products_id=841  $7.50
(Editor's note:  EM does NOT endorse, nor receive any "kick backs" from any of these suppliers.  We list them solely as a service to emcomm operators.  Caveat Emptor!)

"On a message board I visited during a quick look around, some asked:  "Why would the government ban the sale of ammo boxes, and still continue
to sell them at surplus government sales?"   I checked and found that you can buy entire pallets of used ammo boxes at surplus auctions from the government. 

"I also found this notice on a pallet of 50 caliber ammo boxes:  "LOT (340)APPROX. 50 CAL AMMO CANS. DIMENSIONS APPROX. 11" x 6" x 7".
ON PALLETS WITH LIDS IN SEPARATE BASKET. MUTILATION NOT REQUIRED." <http://cgi.govliquidation.com/auction/view?id=2232154&convertTo=USD>

Since it says MUTILATION NOT REQUIRED, so it sounds to me like they can be used with no problem.  So there you go, 340 50 cal ammo boxes, auction
opening on March 17 at Midnight Eastern Time and closing on March 19 at 5:00 pm Eastern Time.  If you got it for the opening bid of only $150.00
that works out to about $0.44 per ammo box.

EM COMMENTS:  Thanks for the in-depth "investigative report" Sam.  The auction closed at $2370, or about $7 per box. - Editor

- -
THE EM ADVISOR
The staff of EMCOMM MONTHLY is happy to answer your questions to the best of our ability.  Some are "FAQs" (Frequently Asked Questions) and others are of a specific nature.  Each month, we will answer questions that may have value to other emcomm radio operators.  Technical questions are forwarded to our Technical Advisor, Ed Ewell, K7DXV.  Questions about our ARCT program or NIMS/ICS are forwarded to Jerry Boyd, N7WR.  Others may be forwarded to other staff members.  Questions regarding emcomm in general are usually handled by D. W. Thorne, K6SOJ. Some will wind up on our FAQ page at: http://www.wrrl.org/faq.asp     

Before submitting a question, we ask our readers to check the FAQ page first...your question may have been asked before.  Also, please consider checking our site search page at: http://www.emcomm.org/search.htm    to see if your question may have been previously addressed in EMCOMM MONTHLY.  Thank you.

- ∙ ∙ ∙ -

Q:  "Thanks for all the news bulletins I receive. Keep up the good work.  Maybe you can help me.  I have a friend, David ZS1DA, who has a Jeep® Wrangler (petrol V6) and has installed his HF rig and ATU in it. Now here the fun starts!!  When the engine is switched off, no QRM!  However, with the engine running, S9 QRM from the engine management system / spark plug distribution system.  Do you do know any hams in and around your neighborhood who drive a petrol Jeep® with possibly the same problems and do you know what rectified the issue?   I would really like to get in touch with them.  Hope to hear from you soon."
Pierre D. Tromp, ZS1HF, WRRL 206, HAMNET, Western Cape,  SOUTH AFRICA

A:  Thanks Pierre, it's sure nice to hear from you!   What year is your friend's Wrangler?  Is it equipped with EFI?  (My vintage 1965 CJ-5 is a carbureted "four-banger," so I don't have any computers to contend with! :-)   My guess is that the culprit is an on-board computer.  I don't have any immediate suggestions to offer, but will ask EM readers with any possible solutions to offer to contact you direct at: zs1hf@telkomsa.net  -- Visit HAMNET at: http://www.wrrl.org/hamnet/index.htm - Editor
- -
ICS PERSPECTIVES
By Jerry Boyd, N7WR, Associate Editor and ICS Advisor
  
This column will continue last month’s discussion regarding how home stations might provide some EMCOMM support during major incidents.  As noted in the March issue, some amateurs, for a variety of reasons, may want to help but are simply unable to respond in the field to emergencies and disasters.  There are a number of important tasks that need to be performed by the EMCOMM unit, but to assign them to a field-capable volunteer might mean that an essential field position is unstaffed.  Here is where the "homebound" can step in.
 
Radio traffic in response to an emergency/disaster is important and it needs to be documented.  There are multiple reasons why documentation is important.  Just one of those reasons is to aid in the after-action critique/evaluation of the incident response.  The home-based station may be in a good position to monitor and audio record all radio traffic involving the EMCOMM unit response to the incident.  Whether done by a tape recorder or via a computer sound card, this is important data to compile and is the type which a “ham at home” can gather.
 
Every group, including EMCOMM groups, have need for logistical support during their operational periods.  Food, water, fresh batteries, fuel, notepads, sunscreen, etc….all may need to be replenished if the event is of long duration.  The ham at home can be a valuable resource in determining what is needed, where it is needed, and when it is needed and then making arrangements to procure same and have it delivered.
 
Finally, events of long duration cannot be handled by the initial crew of responding radio operators.  There will be a need to relieve them with fresh operators.  The home-bound station can help team leaders determine staffing needs, and recruit and schedule replacement operators as necessary.
 
In summary, the home station has more than ample opportunities to be of service.  More on this subject will be discussed in the May issue.
73 from NE Oregon de N7WR  n7wr@wrrl.org
- -
WRRL NEWS and NETS 

 REGIONAL EMCOMM NETS (ALL SERIOUS EMCOMM STATIONS WELCOME):
    Pacific (and Mountain) Time Zones:  PTZNN (aka Jefferson Noon Net/JNN) daily at 1200 PTZ on 7214/± kHz (7204 and 3911± kHz alternate)

    Central (and Eastern) Time Zones:  CTZNN Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 1200 CTZ  on 7214± kHz
 WRRL NET on  MONDAYS on 14.280 MHz USB (listen up or down the band as much as 20 kHz)
   2000Z (When on Daylight Saving Time) and 2100Z (When on Standard Time)
 WRRL STATION MAP UPDATE
   Map showing the location of WRRL stations can be viewed at: http://www.wrrl.org/map   

- -
TRAFFIC HANDLING

“For want of a letter, a word was lost.
             For want of a word, a message was lost.
                         For want of a message, a life was lost.”

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Record Message Traffic, by skilled operators, and by RADIO (only)!"   It's about Dependability, Accuracy and Accountability!

NET and TRAFFIC HANDLING

UPDATES:

LINCOLN NOON NET - LNN (CTZNN) M-W-F 
MONDAYS, WEDNESDAYS, and FRIDAYS at 1200 CTZ on 7214 kHz ± LSB.
All emcomm stations in the Central (U.S.) Time Zone, PLUS the Eastern and Mountain Time Zones are invited to check in.

JEFFERSON NOON NET - JNN (PTZNN) DAILY
DAILY at 1200 PTZ on 7214 kHz ± LSB.  (7204 and 3911 kHz alternate)
Stations in the MTZ (and CTZ, if the band is very long) are also welcome!

The LNN and the JNN are for operators who want to learn and/or practice proper net operating procedures and standardized traffic handling skills.  Stations in the MTZ (band conditions permitting) can potentially participate in both of these nets, and thereby provide a relay circuit between the east coast and the west coast on 40 meters three times a week!   It is anticipated that the LNN will eventually become a daily circuit.

- ∙ ∙ ∙ -
THE “TRAFFIC HANDLER’S MANTRA”
  (Recite often to help remember the eight parts in preamble):
“No • Prepared • Ham • Should • Copy • Priority • Traffic • Delayed”
NUMBER 
PRECEDENCE HX (Handling Instructions) • STATION OF ORIGIN CHECK PLACE OF ORIGIN TIME DATE

To help you to memorize the eight parts of the preamble,  RECITE the "Traffic Handlers Mantra" often:
“No • Prepared • Ham • Should • Copy • Priority • Traffic • Delayed”

ASSESS
your current traffic handling skill.  Take the "TRAFFIC HANDLER’S CHALLENGE" at: www.emcomm.org       (main page)

- -
NATIONAL EMCOMM TRAFFIC SERVICE  (N.E.T.S.)

The NATIONAL EMCOMM TRAFFIC SERVICE uses designated watch and calling frequencies.   Public service amateur radio operators everywhere are invited to monitor these frequencies whenever possible.  But when disasters or other incidents occur, emcomm operators are asked to warm up their radios and "light up" the NATIONAL EMCOMM TRAFFIC SERVICE..."24/7".  Active operators know which bands are most likely to be "open" depending upon the time of day, season, etc.

During disasters and for other emergencies, the frequencies are "open nets".  When traffic becomes heavy, they will become "command and control" frequencies with a net control station "triaging traffic" and directing stations with traffic to another (traffic) frequency.  (At least 5 kHz away.)  Proper net procedures are essential.

NETS does not maintain regular schedules and does not handle routine "make work" messages such as birthday greetings, "your license is about to expire", "book messages", etc.  NETS is intended to supplement and fortify other networks by providing a vehicle for emcomm operators to originate, relay and deliver legal radio message traffic (I.e. - "first class mail") of any precedence, at any time, from and to anyone and anywhere--especially during disasters or other crises.  NETS stations will cooperate and use other networks that are known to be capable of accurately and efficiently handling RADIOGRAMS.

NATIONAL EMCOMM TRAFFIC SERVICE (NETS) WATCH • MONITOR • CALLING • TRAFFIC FREQUENCIES
All listed frequencies (except 60 meters) are nominal.  Actual nets may be up or down as much as 20 kHz
SSB:
•   1982 kHz

•   3911 kHz RADIO RESCUE (SSB and CW)
•   5332 kHz "Up" to other 60M channels as necessary. 50W maximum ERP. (Activated during actual incidents.)
•   7214 kHz
• 14280 kHz
ALASKA ONLY: 5167.5 kHz (USB emergency traffic only)

CW:
•   1911 kHz
•   3540 kHz
•   3911 kHz RADIO RESCUE (SSB and CW)
•   7111 kHz
• 10119 kHz

• 14050 kHz
ALASKA -
 3540/7042/14050 kHz
GULF STATES (LA, MS, TX, AL) - 7111 kHz 1100Z-2300Z / 3570 kHz 2300Z-1100Z

  During EMERGENCIES: 7111 kHz daytime,  3570 kHz nighttime.

  (Times approximate depending on band conditions and changes in sunrise/sunset.)


VHF/UHF FM
• LOCAL EMCOMM SIMPLEX - 146.55 MHz
• RED CROSS EMCOMM SIMPLEX - 147.42 MHz
• NATIONAL CALLING SIMPLEX - 146.52 MHz 

Frequencies listed may be on or near other established net frequencies.

As a matter of operating courtesy, always move up or down a few kHz to avoid QRM when a frequency is in use.
- -
"SHOW US YOUR SHACK"
 
"SHOW US YOUR SHACK" is at: http://www.emcomm.org/em/shacks     
• Send a picture of you AND your shack (all in one frame and in JPG or JPEG format) to: k6soj@wrrl.org   
- -
FEATURE SECTION

FORM OR FORMAT?
(An EM basic studies training module by the EM / WRRL Staff)

Each month we receive several messages questioning or challenging the value of the universal record formal message FORMAT  (RADIOGRAMS).  Most are pushing for the adoption of the ICS213 "Speed Memo" (which is cumbersome, and was not designed for nor intended for radio message traffic.)  In the last issue of EM we focused on TACTICAL communications, but we received three such letters...all from emcomm "leaders" praising and/or promoting ICS213 and landline and infrastructure-dependant radio-computer-hybrid systems for emcomm.  Apparently we have not been "getting through" ... so
we'll try again.

In addition to TACTICAL emcomm, an equally important purpose of amateur radio emcomm is to deliver third-party message traffic, FROM anyone, anywhere, anytime, TO anyone, anywhere, anytime, when the normal means of communications fail, are overloaded, or are shut down by "the authorities."

"Anyone, anywhere, anytime" includes locations where there is NO computer terminal available, or telephone service (including cellular telephones), and/or other commercial services are down and/or out.  In a major disaster, normal postal service may also be disrupted for weeks or even months.  While "anywhere" includes EOCs and "served agency" offices,  it also includes evacuation centers, shelters, community centers and churches, and neighborhoods.  Anywhere is wherever a need for emcomm exists on behalf of the general public.  See "basis and purpose" FCC Part 97.1

Two main components are necessary for radio amateurs to send, relay, and deliver third party message traffic via radio.  The first is, of course, the hardware.  A power source, a radio transceiver, an antenna, and a key or mic.  Most amateurs are capable of setting up and operating the radio equipment.  The second is, the ability to communicate intelligently and in a clear, concise manner using standardized, proper operating procedures.  This article deals only with the latter.

As soon as written languages were developed, messages began to be sent from one location to another.  Usually hand carried by foot courier, rider, or by boat.  From the earliest times, the message was considered sacred.  To prevent tampering, epistles, (messages or letters) were either written on scrolls or placed in envelopes and sealed.  It was common practice for the originator to seal the message with beeswax plus a stamp impression using a "signet ring".  If the message arrived at its destination and the seal was intact, the recipient knew that the message had not been compromised.

Millions of letters are mailed and delivered every day in sealed envelopes.  First class mail is still considered "sacred" and cannot be legally opened and read, much less tampered with, except when authorized by postal inspectors with a reasonable cause.

Consider a RADIOGRAM to be the same as FIRST CLASS MAIL.  THE MESSAGE IS SACRED TRUST!   Of course a RADIOGRAM is not private, but handling third-party messages is considered a serious responsibility by all skilled and ethical radio operators.  A MESSAGE MUST NEVER BE MODIFIED, either intentionally or accidentally along the route.  By using the universal RADIOGRAM message format, radio operators can relay and deliver messages with a high degree of reliability, accuracy, and speed.  Using radio messages can be passed and delivered without reliance upon any landline or infrastructure based systems.

Too many hams are hung up on the FORM, as opposed to the universal message FORMAT.   In radio message traffic, no "FORM" is ever actually sent over the air.  Attempting to send a "form" is unrealistic.  The RADIOGRAM, is the only message FORMAT that is truly universal, and is the most effective method that has ever been developed to forward messages rapidly by radio.  It is simple to learn and use, and works flawlessly in any mode.  It can easily be changed back and forth from one mode to another.  (Morse can even be sent using a blinking light.)  Why anything so simple has been made to look so complicated is beyond comprehension.

In the June 2008 issue of EM http://www.emcomm.org/em/2008/june2008.htm  we said:  "The best tool for radio message traffic is still the universal RADIOGRAM format.   A long time ago, landline and radio telegraphers, and (later) voice radio operators, figured out that the universal RADIOGRAM format is the best way to reliably relay message traffic.  It still remains the best method, especially under compromised conditions.  It is not unique to amateur radio, nor it is a proprietary, nor is it an ARRL/NTS invention.  It is the direct descendant from the Western Union telegram, world-wide cablegram, commercial maritime and aeronautical radiograms, and has been used by military and naval services around the world for about a hundred years."

FYI: The IARU (International Amateur Radio Union) has mandated that only the universal RADIOGRAM format (minus a provision for handling instructions)* be used in their upcoming "2009GlobalSET" on April 18.  NOTE: Monitor all you want...but this SET is not open to emcomm stations "at large".
Ref:  http://www.iaru-r3.org/dcom/IARU-msg1.pdf

EXAMPLE:  During or following a disaster, an emcomm volunteer operator is located near an evacuation center with a Handie Talkie.  (Remember  those long lines and crowds following Hurricane Katrina?)  An evacuee asks if he or she can send a message to relatives.  The radio ham already knows how to correctly  FORMAT a message without searching for a guide book or a form, and pulls out a piece of paper, originates a RADIOGRAM, and gets it into a local net.
NO FORM IS NECESSARY AND  NO FORM IS EVER SENT OVER THE AIR.

 

FYI:  THERE IS NO "MORATORIUM" ON OUTBOUND TRAFFIC IN A DISASTER OPERATION.  There is often a 48-72 hour "moratorium" on sending INBOUND WELFARE inquiries.  This gives relief agencies time to register victims and possibly know where they have been relocated.

The RADIOGRAM FORMAT is like a short letter.
Following the preamble (a tool used solely by the radio operators passing the traffic), it is a simple as P, 1, 2, 3...!
As we all learned in grade school it begins with:
1. To whom and where it is going.  (The addressee).
2. The message text. (Just like any other short letter.)
3. The signature.  (Who the message is from.  And, if a reply is requested a return "address" or another way to contact the sender.)

AT THE TOP (ABOVE THE ADDRESSEE) IS THE PREAMBLE
The preamble is for the radio operators only.  It provides a record of the message, that the message can then be accurately and efficiently relayed by multiple stations (if necessary), and may include any special instructions.  THIS PROCEDURE MUST REMAIN THE SAME FOR ALL MODES.  A RADIOGRAM MAY ORIGINATE BY LOCAL FM, BE RELAYED VIA SSB, CW, OR A KEYBOARD MODE, AND SWITCED BACK TO FM FOR DELIVERY VIA A LOCAL VHF NET.

The originating station places the PREAMBLE at the top of the message (above the address).

1. First, he/she assigns a number (NR) to the message.  This NEVER changes for that message.  (Just like a number on a personal check.)
2. Next, he/she assigns a PRECEDENCE:  EMERGENCY, priority, welfare, routine.  (EMERGENCY, P, W, and R in CW.) 
3. Next, he/she adds any special Handling Instructions (HX) - (Optional, and often not used.)
4. Next, follows the station of origin.  (His/her call sign)
5. Next, is a one or two digit CHECK.  (This is the number of words, number groups, mixed groups in the TEXT.)
6. Next, comes the place of origin.  (Example: Summerfield, IA)
7. Next, using the 24 hour system, is the TIME.  (Time is optional, and if it is anything other than "Z" (ZULU), you must specify.  (Example: 1530EST)
8. Last item in the preamble is the DATE.  MONTH (Three letter abbreviation followed by one or two figures.  Example: MAR 15.)

Six, seven or eight simple items*.  ALWAYS sent in the same order!   Then, after two skilled operators have established contact, the receiving operator knows that when he/she hears:  "Follows message NR13" (number wun, thuh-ree, on 'phone), the next thing heard will be the PRECEDENCE (Skilled operators do NOT say the prowords like "PRECEDENCE" -- you would NOT send it in CW so why say it on 'phone?)...and so on.  The PREAMBLE is said or sent like this:

NR19 R HXG WB9FHP 25 PAOLI IN 0655Z FEB 10

Add a few prowords (procedural words on 'phone) or prosigns (in CW)** and with a little practice, it becomes easy and natural to handle message traffic accurately and efficiently, and it's also an enjoyable and rewarding skill.  By using the universal format, messages can easily be transferred from phone to CW to keyboard and back without ANY modifications.

FYI:  Skilled traffic handlers DO NOT waste time by saying or sending extra (and unnecessary words) like:  "check," "originating station," "date," "going to,"  or "message text is," etc.  Simple huh?

You can remember the PREAMBLE order by memorizing the mantra:
“No • Prepared • Ham • Should • Copy • Priority • Traffic • Delayed”
(NUMBER • PRECEDENCE • HX • STATION OF ORIGIN • CHECK • PLACE OF ORIGIN • TIME • DATE)


Most experienced traffic operators use plain paper to copy a message for relay or delivery.***  For the final delivery of a RADIOGRAM, it can be written, typed, printed, or pasted onto just about anything.  Even an ICS213!  However, a WRRL or ARRL or your own station's RADIOGRAM FORM is nice is when the message is delivered via FIRST CLASS MAIL or by special courier.

As for the final delivery of  a message, using a telephone is fine, as long as you actually deliver the message the addressee.  We do NOT advocate leaving messages on answering machines or "voice mail" device, or sending a message blindly to a computer via email, since there is no way to know if the message ever got to the actual addressee.

* HX is considered optional.  The same for TIME.  (If they're not needed...don't use them.)

** Most common (used in ALL RADIOGRAMS) on 'phone is the proword "BREAK" and in CW is the prosign BT.  Both are followed by a short pause in transmission between the address and the text and again following the text but before the signature.  (The pause allows the receiving station to ask for a "fill" if necessary.)

*** http://www.emcomm.org/products/images/radiogram1.jpg
*** http://www.emcomm.org/products/images/stamp_impression.jpg

- ∙ ∙ ∙ -
======================================================
EMCOMM SPECIALTY PRODUCTS

EMCOMM "LICENSE PLATES"

View at:  http://www.emcomm.org:80/products/  
$10.00 each or 2 for $18.00 - postpaid

Or, outfit your emcomm team by ordering:
10 for $70.00 - postpaid (shipped to one address)
Mail check or money order to:  EMCOMM, P.O. BOX 99, Macdoel, CA  96058

RADIOGRAM TRAINING DVD
Features D. W. Thorne, K6SOJ, as the instructor.  The session was taped live at the U.S.F.S. facility at Redding, CA on October 29, 2005 by Paul Peterson (K6PTT).  As you watch it, you'll feel like you are actually in the classroom.  DW begins with a review of the history of communications beyond the horizon, followed by a thorough explanation of the "whys and wherefores" of basic message handling.  Essential information for all emcomm operators is presented in a palatable way. The video includes a brief overview of the ICS.  Thanks to Robert Jackson (KB6YTD) of Weaverville, CA, the quality is good.  Disclaimer: This is not your usual scripted, studio, well-rehearsed, and edited training video--it is raw and unedited and it includes flub-ups, bloopers, jokes, as well as unsolicited comments! There are a few "glitches" that could not be remedied; however, it is not necessary to adjust your player or TV when you encounter them, but rather just let the video run.  Not rated. 155 minutes.   $10.00 ea. and includes protective case, study and instructor's guide.  $5.00 for extra DVD (disc only) to same address.  $18.00 for two complete sets to one address.  The DVD is copyrighted.  Contact us for permission to make copies (for non-commercial use only).
Send check payable to: EMCOMM, P. O. Box 99, Macdoel, CA  96058

MORE EMCOMM SPECIALTY PRODUCTS AT:
http://www.emcomm.org:80/products  

=====================================================
NEW SUBSCRIBERS - WELCOME!

• Fred Jones, WA4SWF, Louisa, KY - ARES® EC, KY Emergency Management PIO
• Jim Wylder, KE6OJ, Silverdale, WA - Kitsap County ACS, RACES, ARES®
• Jeff Miller, K7JJM, Skagit County, WA - ARES® AEC, RACES
• Oliver Jolly, WW5OJ, Philadelphia, MS - ARES®
• Adam Karsin, KG4WWH, Clearwater, FL -  ARES®, RACES
• Jack Eyster, KI6PPW, Woodland Hills, CA - LAFD ACS, LAFD CERT
• David Malin, AA6RV, Canyon Country, CA - ARES®, LAFD ACS, LASD DCS
• Ralph Rosen, K6RBR, Calabasas, CA - LAFD ACS
• Robert Hanson, W6RH, Newbury Park, CA -ACS, ARES®, RACES
• Rosalind Clifton, KG6TRT, Winnetka, CA - ARES®, LAFD ACS
• Jack Root, KD6VSB, Los Angeles, CA - LAFD ACS
• Jim Sage, WB8TWM, Columbus, OH - ARES®, RACES, MARS, Red Cross
• Donald Kemp, NN8B, Hanoverton, OH - Navy MARS, ARES®, RACES
 Billy Jackley, W7DMV, Holladay, UT - ARES®, ERC
• Leon Taylor, KI6WDZ, Sacramento, CA
• Davina Nolten, KE7JQV, Federal Way, WA - ARES®
• Samuel Maree, ZS1SAM, Cape Town, South Africa
• Jaime Manuel L. G. A. Sousa, CT2JBD, Talaíde, Lisbon, Portugal
• Harry E. Bell, Jr., WA8BNS, Zanesville, OH - ARES®, MARS
• Vicki Dickerson Ball, KI6TNT, Yuba City, CA - ARES®
• Barbara Conciatori, KI4VOV - Palm Harbor, FL
• Frank D. Holt III, KB2VYZ, Somers Point, NJ - ARES® AEC, RACES, CERT
Steven Aamodt, K7SJA, Hillsboro, OR - NDMS, Oregon Disaster Medical Team
Barry Thaysen, K3UG, Copperopolis, CA - ARES®, RACES, Cal-Fire VIP
Jonathan Zimmerman, K6JGZ, North Hollywood, CA - LAFD ACS, ARES®
David Carleton, KF7AJJ, Las Vegas, NV - ARES®, SKYWARN
Sean Fox, WD6FOX, Canyon Country, CA - LAFD ACS, LAPD CEMP, SAR
Jim Snyder, AJ4NO, Knoxville, TN - ARES®
Robert Petty, WB7SGL, Denver, CO


RECENT CONTRIBUTOR$ - Thank you for your support!

The individuals listed below have recently made monetary contributions to help EMCOMM MONTHLY and EMCOMM.ORG survive.

No contributions were received this month.

EMCOMM MONTHLY and EMCOMM.ORG are private (non-government, non-commercial) endeavors and are funded by donations from emcomm operators who are concerned about preserving the ability of amateur radio operators to be prepared to provide skilled, accurate and efficient emergency communications during times of disaster or other events where normal channels of communication may be interrupted or overloaded.  If you have benefited from our efforts, and would like to support this work in a tangible way, you may do so by sending a check or money order payable to: EMCOMM.

Mail to: EMCOMM, PO Box 99, Macdoel, CA  96058.  Your donation is an outright gift and is NOT tax-deductible.

SORRY: We have no PayPal®, credit card, or other methods to accept the electronic transfer of funds.  "We do it the old fashioned way!"


REFERENCE and RESOURCE SECTION
 
• ICS-ARCT GUIDE:  www.emcomm.org/ARCT/     
• WRRL ARCT Page www.wrrl.org/arct_program/    

• TRAFFIC HANDLER’S CHALLENGE: http://www.emcomm.org/thc     
• OPERATING PROCEDURES:  www.wrrl.org/operating    
• PHONETICS: www.wrrl.org/operating/itu_phonetics.htm    
• RADIOTELEPHONE PROCEDURES: www.wrrl.org/operating/icao_radiotelephony.htm     

• GEAR AND EQUIPMENT LIST: www.emcomm.org      (Click on GEAR CHECK LIST)

• FEMA TRAINING COURSES:  http://training.fema.gov/emiweb/IS/crslist.asp     
• FEMA TRAINING COURSE IS-700 (NIMS): http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/IS/is700a.asp
• ARRL FSD-218.  The famous “pink card” that contains (almost) “everything you ever needed to know about RADIOGRAMS”.
  An electronic version of FSD-218 is at: http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/forms/#fsd-218     
• NTS page by W7ARC: http://www.w7arc.com/nts     
• NATIONAL TRAFFIC SYSTEM (NTS) Methods and Practices Guidelines: http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/nts-mpg/     
• PACIFIC AREA TRAFFIC NETS:  http://home.earthlink.net/~k7bfl/nwnets.html     
• MARITIME MOBILE SERVICE NETWORK: http://mmsn.org/  
• BEAUFORT WINDSPEED SCALE:  http://www.zetnet.co.uk/sigs/weather/Met_Codes/beaufort.htm     
• NOAA/NWS WINDCHILL CHART: http://www.weather.gov/os/windchill/index.shtm     
• STANDARD TIME ZONE SCALE:  http://www.travel.com.hk/region/timezone.htm     
• HOSPITAL DISASTER SUPPORT COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM (HDSCS):  http://www.hdscs.org     
• U. S. AIR FORCE Search and Rescue SURVIVAL MANUAL MIRROR SIGNALING (AFM 64-5 Aug. 1969)
   http://www.emcomm.org/drawings/Mirror_Signaling_mid.jpg     
 
SUBSCRIBE TO EMCOMM MONTHLY  www.emcomm.org/subscription.htm   -- IMPORTANT:  Many internet service providers (ISPs) are installing "SPAM filters" in their system that may block EMCOMM MONTHLY both inbound or outbound (if you try to forward it to someone).  To ensure that you receive EM and SPECIAL BULLETINS add: @cot.net, @wrrl.org, and @emcomm.org to your "Whitelist" with your ISP.  Contact your ISP if you have any questions.

 

ABOUT ADDRESS CHANGES:  Every month, a varying number of EM are returned as "undeliverable addressee unknown" or "rejected due to containing possible objectionable material".  Our very limited, all-volunteer staff does not have the time, energy, or desire to track down everyone who changes their email address and forgets to notify us.  Also, if a subscriber installs a "spam filter" or a "parental control device" and neglects to tell the filter that it's "OK to let  EM  pass through", we do not have time or patience to jump through secret hoops, or solve puzzles, to allow us to send email to you.

If you change your email address, be sure to notify us at: www.emcomm.org/subscription.htm  ... that is, if you want to continue to receive EM.  EMCOMM MONTHLY is originated in 10, 12, 14, and 18 point Arial font and transmitted in HTML format.  Occasionally, selected portions are set up in the Lucida Console font.  HOWEVER...we have received a few reports that on some computer screens...EM appears unformatted in Plain Text or FUBAR.  ("Fouled Up Beyond All Recognition.")  If this happens to you, you can always view EM, as it is intended to appear, at: www.emcomm.org/em      

Upon request  EMCOMM MONTHLY will be transmitted in plain text format to visually impaired subscribers who use an email-to-audio conversion program, and/or other subscribers whose computers do not process email in HTML format.


EMCOMM MONTHLY archiveswww.emcomm.org/em     
 
SEARCH FEATURE AT EMCOMM.ORG  www.emcomm.org     
 

The opinions expressed by individual contributors do not necessarily reflect the EM philosophy, the editorial position of EM, or its staff.

 

ARES® and Amateur Radio Emergency Service® are registered service marks of the

American Radio Relay League Inc., and are used with permission.


For permission to reproduce material in EMCOMM MONTHLY
contact: D. W. Thorne at: k6soj@wrrl.org  or write:
EMCOMM MONTHLY, P.O. Box 99, Macdoel, CA  96058  U.S.A.


EM STAFF:
D. W. Thorne, K6SOJ - Editor and Publisher - k6soj@wrrl.org
Jerry Boyd, N7WR - Associate Editor and ICS Advisor - n7wr@wrrl.org     

Bill Frazier, W7ARC - Associate Editor and Webmaster - w7arc@wrrl.org     
Ed Ewell, K7DXV - Technical Advisor - k7dxv@wrrl.org     
Ed "FB" Trump, AL7N - Traffic Editor and Alaska Correspondent - l.trump@att.net   
- -

 

EMCOMM MONTHLY -- The Official Journal of the World Radio Relay League - WRRL®

EM is published 10 times a year (September through June) and is copyrighted (c) 2009 - All rights reserved.
- - ∙    ∙ - ∙ ∙